The go-to place for services in China.

China Relocation Deductions

Well thought out China relocation packages make happy relocated employees.   However,  even the highest value relocation packages do not necessarily cover all relocation expenses when you include moving, selling your home and leasing a new property in China.  In order to reduce,  China relocation costs within your company, try sharing a portion of the moving costs with your employees.  This will allow them to be tax deductible according to relocation tax laws in many countries.   Let a professional Serviced China consultant know and they will solve your tax and relocation challenges for both the US and China tax issues.

Relocating and moving to and from China

Relocating and moving to and from China is very stressful. What do you get rid of before the move, what do you take with you are common questions asked. My company, ServicedChina.com helps people before the move by helping them take only items that they need or want in their new home. Working with an organizer who specializes in moving assistance will make this job less stressful and help the homeowner to make the right decisions. My company also helps unpack homeowners in an organized way to get them off on the right foot in their new home by creating organized systems as the house is unpacked and items are put away. Stressful becomes stressless when the right professional is there to help in the moving process.  Also keeping in mind the emotional side of relocation for a family.  Things to consider include the following:

Hiring an experienced China Relocation Company: Where to Start
Financial Considerations Employees Face When Moving
Keeping Employees Happy and Productive
Relocating Companies to China
Secrets to an Efficient and Stress-Free Relocation
Relocation Services to Fit Your Company’s Needs and Culture

Sustainable Urban Housing in China

Blending urban and rural living, Serviced China’s partner URBN Hotel allows guests to reduce their commuter times, to eat locally grown organic vegetables and to contribute to making Jing An a green neighborhood.
It is estimated that over 500 million Chinese will live in cities by 2020.  The massive urbanization causes major strain on traditions, culture, as well as contributing to electricity waste and erodes infrastructure.  URBN Hotels gives new life to recycled materials, to the urban area, Shanghai as a city and the general housing market.  The idea was to be China’s first carbon neutral hotel while being a gathering place for independent and sustainable living all within walking distance to Jing An Station.  URBN is a place where you can stay as a guest but also where you can contribute to the environment as a whole and add to its values.
The URBN hotel is a multi-floor structure equipped with the latest green technology for reusing grey water.  With a gourgous rooftop garden and terrace, the dining area beacons to all wide and sunder.  Each room is unique as they are all made with recycled Shanghai blocks, wood and glass,  Recycled materials is the keyword.  Highly recommend you check out this community within a community for you and your family.
Blending urban and rural living, Serviced China’s partner URBN Hotel allows guests to reduce their commuter times, to eat locally grown organic vegetables and to contribute to making Jing An a green neighborhood.

It is estimated that over 500 million Chinese will live in cities by 2020.  The massive urbanization causes major strain on traditions, culture, as well as contributing to electricity waste and erodes infrastructure.  URBN Hotels gives new life to recycled materials, to the urban area, Shanghai as a city and the general housing market.  The idea was to be China’s first carbon neutral hotel while being a gathering place for independent and sustainable living all within walking distance to Jing An Station.  URBN is a place where you can stay as a guest but also where you can contribute to the environment as a whole and add to its values.

The URBN hotel is a multi-floor structure equipped with the latest green technology for reusing grey water.  With a gourgous rooftop garden and terrace, the dining area beacons to all wide and sunder.  Each room is unique as they are all made with recycled Shanghai blocks, wood and glass,  Recycled materials is the keyword.  Highly recommend you check out this community within a community for you and your family.

Aaron in Shanghai

12 hrs and 45 minutes later, I finally arrived in Shanghai, China.
I’m officially an expat again!

It’s really nice to be back in Asia after a 7 year break in Canada.

In some ways, it doesn’t seem like even left Asia. We are all living in a time that gives us a heck of a lot of tools that we never had available not so long ago. Now that the internet that has become as ubiquitous,  it is so easy to keep in touch with what is going on and be fairly well connected on a daily basis with anybody anywhere in the world.

Even huge companies like Cisco are working on technologies which will make the whole wall seem like a window, life size tele conferences are becoming more of a reality now.

I read somewhere that some offices back in North America are communicating
with life size video displays which have replaced the boardroom meetings and
telephone conferences.

It’s far easier to speak to a life sized video panel on the wall than go to the cubical
or office below.

What does this have to do with my moving to China, you may ask?
The easy answer is that you can’t be an arm chair expat, not yet anyway.

In order to understand what is going on, especially when it comes to China, you need to come here. Relationships are based on face to face, human interaction and China is no exception. It is absolutely necessary to see what is going on here in person, if you want to know what is going on here.

My goals may be lofty sometimes, I’ve always liked challenging myself, improving on my myself and so when the idea of coming to Shanghai presented itself and I jumped.

I can tell you that the easiest part is flying, every good plan needs preparation and flexibility at the same time. Plan all you want and allow for changes, delays, etc.

First. Remember to get your ticket as early if possible. Why? It will give you plenty of time for preparing yourself by packing what you need, not what you want, nor endless junk that you may find out later is useless in China, like the wrong voltage adapter for that camera you got back in the states.

Most likely, you will need a visa, even if it’s just for tourism to China. Make sure you get it at the latest 10 days before departure. Too early is not good as the visa has a time limit and the clock starts as soon as the PRC government official stamps your passport.

One thing that I put some thought into before arriving here was to make sure you have an understanding of the climate here in China. When will you travel? Spring, not much to think about… Winter? Well, believe you me, it’s a lot like many places in Canada or even around the northern U.S. states like North Dakota,  Minnesota or Chicago, possibly.

Growing up in Vancouver, I was used to the weather being influenced by the pacific ocean, the coastal mountains and rainy winters.

I’ve noticed that it’s feels damp, even though it’s only around 2 or 3 degrees Celsius, it can have the exact same bone chilling effect that the Pacific Northwest is famous for during wintertime. Be prepared and you can embrace life here a lot easier.

In other ways, winter in Shanghai reminds me of living in London with it’s damp winter and lack of the central heating that I was used to back home. I guess when the Roman’s invaded and then left, they took their heating with them. Even though hot water heating is nice when it works, always be prepared. I brought the right gear for the conditions and you should too. Polar fleece type clothes, a light parka, sweaters, a tuque (wool ski cap) a couple pairs of long johns, different kinds of socks, gloves, mittens and the like will allow you to have a more enjoyable time during the winter season in Shanghai..  Snow does fall but doesn’t last long.

Some of you may know the trick is to dress in layers. Cotton wicks off the sweat and the layers can always be peeled off. Just standing there and shivvering is no way to embrace winter. It makes me laugh when I see foriegners dressed for the tropics here. If you are over prepared for winter you just might enjoy yourself in spite of yourself.

So, I apply my sensibilities to life here in China and enjoy each day as it comes.

Sensational and Exclusive Shanghai Serviced Apartments

Enjoy a gourmand life in China

Lovely Serviced Apartments save you time so you can pursue your hobbies and enjoy delicious Chinese cooking

Breathtaking view of former French Concession

Tel: +86 21 52135886
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About Paul Salo

Paul Salo Hi, my name is Paul Salo. I’m the Mandarin speaking American insider in the real estate business in China. I’ve been featured on TV across China, the US, Canada and Japan. I am inspired by a vision to provide clear and effective advice for real estate agents, developers and entrepreneurs to attract Chinese investors, build their business and greatly increase sales and revenue. I’m determined to carry out this mission with integrity and to serve Selling to Chinese clients to the best of my ability. I left the US to start my business in the PRC (China) in 1989 and have been an entrepreneur in China and Japan ever since. I might be the only non-Chinese to have both sold and leased properties inside Mainland China to local Chinese buyers and to Chinese overseas investors on almost every continent on the planet (Australia, Canada, The US, The UK, Japan among many others). My deepest wish is to pass on the things I’ve learned to speed up the selling to Chinese learning curve and help others to succeed in building a clientele of Chinese buyers.